Old Iron II

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She lives!!

The 1963 Ford/ALF is back out of the garage under her own power for the first time in almost three years.  The clutch line is fixed, the batteries are charged, and we plan to be off to Lynnfield on Saturday for the annual MAFAA show.

She’s supposed to be for sale, but I’m having fun.  We shall see.

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  • http://profiles.google.com/captschmoe Joseph Schmoe

    I became a certified driver in 1987 on a ’67 Segrave, same cab/chassis.  I think it had a 534 C.I. gas engine with a 5 speed manual transmission. Although you had to be careful when putting it into reverse, it maneuvered well in tight areas and pumped pretty good. I kinda miss it.

    Half of the pussy engineers we have today have never driven a stick in a car, let alone an engine.

    I suspect it is still serving somewhere down in Mexico.

  • http://notesfrommosquitohill.com mack505

    *comment moved to proper location / please disregard*

  • http://notesfrommosquitohill.com mack505

    My first was a 1963 Cornbinder, around 1991.  Same thing, plus square gears.

    This Ford is a dream to drive as compared to other antiques.  It has power steering, short wheelbase, and great brakes.  I have the 534 as well.  Tons of torque.  The manual transmission is interesting; the cabover and old linkage make shifting an exercise in divination.  If it grinds it’s reverse, if not it’s second.

    I second your thought about modern engineers.  The fleet is all automatic now.  Most of them even have pushbutton shifters.  It’s great for the ipod generation, but it doesn’t have the same class.  (And don’t get me started about where today’s rigs will be in 50 years.)